The Soviets liberated Auschwitz – what was left of it – not the Americans. Perhaps he meant to say Dachau? Perhaps his uncle was in the Red Army? See below the split for entire list of camps liberated by Americans, and by which units.

UPDATE:
The story broke May 27 (I knew that) and according to one of our comments (by Jason) Obama corrected himself the same day. I do not agree that a person can mix up Birkenau and Buchenwald. I do believe that he could have heard this as a young kid and consequently mixed it up. This story did not hit my radar – for whatever unknown reason – so mea culpa on commenting on old news. However – I pointed this out to show that people mix up names all the time and that Obama if he wants to win better get the record straight. That is if he is going to be critical of McCain’s grasp of complex issues in Iraq. If any one has a clip of this retraction I would like to see how Obama handled it. However, lets please not slip into shoot-from-the-hip reactions whenever Obama is criticized — that will not help is completing a regime change.

To commemorate the unveiling of the National World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C., in 2004, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum once again honors the brave men and women who risked their lives to free their fellow human beings from bondage.

U.S. ARMY DIVISIONS RECOGNIZED AS LIBERATING UNITS BY THE UNITED STATES HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL M– USEUM AND THE CENTER OF MILITARY HISTORY

INFANTRY DIVISIONS:

1st Infantry Division
Liberated Falkenau an der Eger (Flossenbürg subcamp)

2nd Infantry Division
Liberated Leipzig-Schönefeld (Buchenwald subcamp)
Spergau (labor education camp)

4th Infantry Division
Liberated Dachau subcamp

8th Infantry Division
Liberated Wöbbelin (Neuengamme subcamp)

26th Infantry Division
Liberated Gusen (Mauthausen subcamp)

29th Infantry Division
Liberated Dinslaken (civilian labor camp)

36th Infantry Division
Liberated Kaufering camps (Dachau subcamps)

42nd Infantry Division
Liberated Dachau

45th Infantry Division
Liberated Dachau

63rd Infantry Division
Liberated Kaufering camps (Dachau subcamps)

65th Infantry Division
Liberated Flossenbürg subcamp

69th Infantry Division
Liberated Leipzig-Thekla (Buchenwald subcamp)

71st Infantry Division
Liberated Gunskirchen (Mauthausen subcamp)

80th Infantry Division
Liberated Buchenwald
Ebensee (Mauthausen subcamp)

83rd Infantry Division
Liberated Langenstein (Buchenwald subcamp)

84th Infantry Division
Liberated Ahlem (Neuengamme subcamp)
Salzwedel (Neuengamme subcamp)

86th Infantry Division
Liberated Attendorn (civilian labor camp)

89th Infantry Division
Liberated Ohrdruf (Buchenwald subcamp)

90th Infantry Division
Liberated Flossenbürg

95th Infantry Division
Liberated Werl (prison and civilian labor camp)

99th Infantry Division
Liberated Dachau subcamps

103rd Infantry Division
Kaufering subcamp

104th Infantry Division
Liberated Dora-Mittelbau

ARMORED DIVISIONS:

3rd Armored Division
Liberated Dora-Mittelbau

4th Armored Division
Liberated Ohrdruf (Buchenwald subcamp)

6th Armored Division
Liberated Buchenwald

8th Armored Division
Liberated Halberstadt-Zwieberge (Buchenwald subcamp)

9th Armored Division
Liberated Falkenau an der Eger (Flossenbürg subcamp)

10th Armored Division
Dachau subcamp

11th Armored Division
Liberated Gusen (Mauthausen subcamp)
Mauthausen

12th Armored Division
Liberated Dachau subcamp

14th Armored Division
Liberated Dachau subcamps

20th Armored Division
Liberated Dachau

AIRBORNE DIVISIONS:

82nd Airborne Division
Liberated Wöbbelin (Neuengamme subcamp)

101st Airborne Division
Liberated Dachau subcamp

For further information about the origins of this program, see Edward J. Drea, “Recognizing the Liberators. U.S. Army Divisions Enter the Concentration Camps,” Army History. The Professional Bulletin of Army History, Fall/Winter 1992/1993, 1-5.

About the author

Rabbi Yonah

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