shape would smell as well. I could not enter the weekend without one more tiny posting.

Lea Michele, who plays the character of Rachel Berry on the popular Fox TV show, “Glee,” told Access Hollywood this week that she is from a large Italian family and proud of her “Jewish nose.” The star of Broadway’s “Spring Awakening” and former Stagedoor Manor camper said, “I’ve always been proud of my body, my Jewish nose and all of that.” The character of Rachel Berry is one of three Jewish characters on the popular, highly rated, tv dramedy.

Aniston and Streisand (Harper's Bazaar)

Someone without what people would call a Jewish Nose is Jennifer Aniston, an actress, who was selected by the upcoming September 2010 issue of Harper’s Bazaar to interpret the style of Barbra Streisand, a singer, producer, director, FOB, and actress that Lea Michele would love to emulate.

Smell like Jewish teen spirit? Speaking of smelling and scents, there is a Washington DC area rabbi with the smell of herbs on his mind. The Washington City Paper this week interviewed Rabbi Jeffrey Kahn and his wife Stephanie, who want to be one of the first to legally retail cannabis for medical use in the DC area. Stephanie, a nurse and health administrator, whose father used pot to relieve effects of his MS, says their dispensary will be called the Takoma Wellness Center, and they will use dispensary marketing to the best of their ability to spread the word of how medical cannabis can benefit many people, with various types of diseases, pains and illnesses. The Paper reports that it’s the culmination of a sort of mid-life crisis for the couple: After packing up their prior lives of teaching Torah for 27 years (6 of them at Har Shalom in Warren NJ), and making aliya to Herzliya in 2007, they are now in DC, where Rabbi Kahn leads an Interfaith task force on drug policy. (Hmm… any relation to University of Maryland Hillel Educator, Rabbi James Kahn? I bet a nickel bag that there is)

Speaking of nickels, TMZ.com, a gossip mongering site, and The Miami Herald reported basketball star, LeBron James, hired an Israeli rabbi as one of his business advisors to guide him with retailing and other options. he paid much more than a nickel. Rabbi (Yishayahu Yosef) Pinto, who reportedly only speaks Hebrew, is no relation to the Ford automobile of the same name.

Enjoy the weekend. If you happen to be in Chicago, join Congregation Anshe Shalom B’nai Israel for their IFTAR in The Synagogue with their Muslim neighbors. And if West Hampton beach on New York ‘s Long Island is more your style, check out their Limmud FSU Program on Sunday. Yuri Foreman will be there. And an astronaut, too. And if you are in NYC, go to a Mets game. In U.S. Federal court this afternoon, District Judge Jack Weinstein ordered the Mets to stop banning a kosher food company from selling snacks at its CitiField baseball stadium during the Jewish Sabbath. “I cannot get involved in (a dispute) over rabbinical law,” he said with a frankfurter shaped smile. Kosher Sports, which has a 10-year contract to sell hotdogs and other items at the stadium, sued the Mets after being told they couldn’t operate on Friday nights and Saturdays. The Mets say Kosher Sports can’t be kosher if they sell food on Shabbat. Kosher Sports asserted that they sell kosher products for people of all religious beliefs. The judge ordered, in this hearing to show cause, the Mets to back off and stop whining over the kosher wieners while the case is pending. No word yet on what the Sephardic Chief Rabbi of Israel thinks on this case.

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larry

4 Comments

  • “District Judge Jack Weinstein ordered the Mets to stop banning a kosher food company from selling snacks at its CitiField baseball stadium during the Jewish Sabbat”

    If they have a hechsher, the issuer of the hechsher will either permit or not permit them to be open on Shabbos. Beyond that, it’s nobody’s business.

  • Well… I tend to side with The Met… if.. if … if… they selected this kosher food purveyer with a special contract and at a special “reduced” rate, expecting them to only operate 6 days per week. If this purveyer received special treatment, consideration, and rates, then The Mets may have cause to restrict the operations of the food seller, or at least enough to take it to an arbitrator

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