Oh look there’s writer/blogger Amy Rose Spiegel, actress and blasphemous jewelry designer Carlen Altman, Sleater-Kinney vocalist and guitarist Carrie Brownstein, writer, musician and singer Katy Goodman, musician, singer and songwriter Leah Siegel, Girls creator and star Lena Dunham, actress Natasha Lyonne, designer Rachel Antonoff, precocious and amazing kid vblogger Ruby Karp, tween fashion icon Tavi Gavinson etc. Their message? Basically, “F*ck you Republicans. You don’t own me!”

Women constitute more than half of the population. In 2008, 60% of voters were women. It is estimated that 10 million more women than men will vote in this election. Despite this, women make up only 16% of Congress. Women earn only 70 cents to each dollar men make. Women of color and undocumented women make less than white citizens. Mitt Romney and the Republican Party are determined to overturn Roe V. Wade. Romney has not supported equal pay for women (The Lily Ledbetter Fair Pay Act). Romney has vowed to defund Planned Parenthood. Romney has vowed to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Romney doesn’t want health care to cover birth control. Romney says same sex marriage should be banned with a Constitutional Amendment.

Women, let’s rise up. Our vote alone can win this election. A vote for Obama is a vote for your health and your right to choose. It is a vote for equal pay and equal rights. A vote for Obama is a vote for our families. It is a vote to marry who you choose. It’s a vote to start a family when you choose. A vote for Obama says that we won’t stand for violence against women and that rape is rape. Our vote ensures that our daughters will grow up with the same rights that we’ve had. A vote for Obama sends a message: This war on women must end. We will not go backwards.
This election is shockingly close. Our safety is at stake. Our silence is consent and our vote is our voice. Let’s get active. Let’s get out every vote we can. Let’s make this election a mandate. A mandate to finally ensure women the respect, dignity and equality we all deserve! This is now. This is our call to action. Once and for all, let’s take back the power that is so inherently and naturally ours!

But don’t take my word for it. Watch the video:

About the author

wendy in furs

I live and blog anonymously from New York. If my boss knew this was me, I'd be fired in a nano-second. Ha ha! Screw you boss man!

4 Comments

  • —–

    Subject: Fwd: Lori, re: Rabbis For Romney – Surprising Leadership.

    The Sheer, Small-L Liberalism of ‘Rabbis for Romney’.

    The man behind that organization is not a partisan individual. He's a registered Democrat, who didn't want there to be rabbis united for only one candidate.

    By: Lori Lowenthal Marcus.

    Published: October 22nd, 2012.

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    tell a friend.

    Rabbi Bernhard Rosenberg.

    Despite recent polls suggesting Jews may not be voting as a monolithic bloc for the Democratic ticket, at least in this presidential race, it still has to be lonely being a rabbi who has publicly committed to supporting Mitt Romney for U.S. president. And it must be even lonelier for someone who publicly committed to creating an organization called “Rabbis for Romney.”.

    But when you talk to the man behind that organization, you discover that not only is he not lonely, he is not a particularly partisan individual. In fact, he’s a registered Democrat, whose sole purpose for starting Rabbis for Romney is that he didn’t want there to be rabbis united for only one candidate, when he knows that there are Jews who also support Romney.

    And while, unlike Rabbis for Obama, Rabbis for Romney does not boast hundreds of members, Rabbi Bernhard Rosenberg is confident that the hundreds of hours and thousands of emails he has written has had an impact. He knows there are people who are just a little bit better informed because of the efforts he and his dozens of volunteers have put in.

    Rabbi Rosenberg makes it very clear that he is not a conspiracy theorist and he insists that “the president of the United States deserves our respect,” he explained to The Jewish Press.

    CONTINUE READING: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/us-news/the-sheer-small-l-liberalism-of-rabbis-for-romney/2012/10/22/.

  • Head of Rabbis for Romney: ‘The pulpit is for Torah, not politics’.

    Bernhard Rosenberg says he only launched his group to balance Rabbis for Obama, wants the election taken out of the synagogue, calls Obama ‘a fine man’ who isn’t doing enough on Iran.

    By Haviv Rettig GurOctober 22, 2012, 2:52 pm8.

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    Rabbi Bernhard Rosenberg didn’t expect his small but heartfelt initiative to cause such a ruckus. Yet two weeks before a close election, the founder of a group calling itself “Rabbis for Romney” is bound to draw attention.

    <img class="size-s195x293 wp-image-257528" title="Rabbi Bernhard Rosenberg (photo credit: Courtesy)" src="http://cdn.timesofisrael.com/uploads/2012/10/Rabbi-Bernhard-195×293.jpg&quot; alt="Rabbi Bernhard Rosenberg (photo credit: Courtesy)" width="195" height="293" />.
    Rabbi Bernhard Rosenberg (photo credit: Courtesy).

    The group, an informal collection of rabbis without a detailed platform or petition, has already drawn fire from the Huffington Post and avid support from right-wing Jewish commentators online. While some expressed support for the initiative, Rosenberg has fallen prey to the Internet’s rancor, with one commentator calling for him to be burned in a gas chamber.

    For Rosenberg, the divisiveness alone is proof of the need for balance. His group was set up in response to Rabbis for Obama, a group comprising Jewish pro-Obama activists that organized a petition signed by hundreds of rabbis seeking to counter criticism of the president’s policies in some parts of the Jewish community.

    “We’re a grassroots operation,” Rosenberg told The Times of Israel this week, his euphemism for the lack of any support or institutional ties to the Republican Party, right-wing institutions or Jewish groups.

    In fact, Rosenberg only decided to launch the group “because I don’t believe rabbis should be for Romney, or Obama, or anybody.” It was only when Democrats decided to launch a public campaign equating the rabbinate with support for Obama that Rosenberg felt he needed to balance the message.

    “In the case of Obama, I have nothing personally against him; I think he’s a fine man. I think he’s trying hard. But he hasn’t, in my opinion, done enough, particularly for the State of Israel, to make me feel comfortable that Israel will not be under attack by Iran and will be nuked, in which case another Holocaust will happen. If you ask me, ‘Can another Holocaust happen?’ The answer is yes.”.

    When Rosenberg compares the Iranian threat to the Holocaust, it would be a mistake to hear glibness. Rosenberg was born in a displaced persons camp in post-war Europe, the child of Polish-born Holocaust survivors. He has written several books about the Holocaust, including educational works for teenagers.

    While he campaigns publicly to unseat Obama from the presidency, he refuses to bring his politics to the pulpit.

    “I’ve heard from a colleague, a rabbi who spoke about Obama on Rosh Hashanah — a lot of rabbis spoke about Obama from the pulpit on Rosh Hashana, which is against IRS rules, but they did it – I’ve heard this guy was railroaded out of town, because there were a few Republicans in the audience who took major offense.”.

    And, he believes, congregants are right to reject politics from their pulpits. “The pulpit is a place for Torah, not a place for politics,” he affirms.

    “My personal philosophy is that unless a candidate is anti-Semitic or anti-Zionist, I do not speak on behalf or against anyone.” Obama, he explains, is none of those. “He’s not an anti-Semite. I don’t buy into that. He’s not anti-Israel.”.

    Isn’t there a contradiction between calling for a politics-free pulpit and identifying himself as a “Rabbi for Romney?”.

    “This country right now is completely divided in this election,” Rosenberg says. “There’s hatred on both sides. There’s disgust on both sides.”.

    For his part, “I have no incentive to do this. I’m not being offered a job. All I’m getting is hate mail. But you know what? You have to speak out. I’m speaking out. At best, [Republicans] are going to get 25-30 percent of the Jewish vote — at best. So any rabbi speaking out about Romney, considering that most Jews are Democrats, is looking for nothing but trouble. I know I’m making a difference by the very fact that I’m being attacked like there’s no tomorrow.” He points to online comments on articles about him as proof.

    So why is he doing it?

    It’s important to offset the perception that Jews are “unthinking” Democrats, he explains. Jews must be courted by the parties –- a fact that Rabbis for Obama seems to be trying to obfuscate, he believes.

    In showing political variety in the Jewish community, he believes he is making a dent in the partisanship and divisiveness on display in the election.

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